Don’t let your tiny dog turn into one of those hoity-toity fashion accessories Paris Hilton used to carry around. Toss it into this heavy-duty canvas tote instead, which is both better-looking than your mesh carrier and not nearly as eye roll-inducing as a purse. There’s even a cutout on the side, so Finn can stick his head out without getting caught in the zipper.
With a strong, heavy built body and square proportions, the Labrador Retriever is classified as a working dog. One of their trademark characteristic features is a strong jaw set in a broad head. These dogs also have strong legs and shoulders, which add to their fast pace. At full adult size, they stand at about 21 to 24 inches in height at the withers (the highest part of the back), with a weight of 50 to 80 pounds. The coat is straight, dense, and short, with the outer coat being a bit coarse, and the undercoat thick and soft. This makes the Labrador all but completely waterproof, with the thick undercoat protecting the skin, and the outer guard coat whisking water away. Labradors have a certain distinct elegance, carrying themselves with an upright, proud demeanor, but with a friendly facial expression that invites new acquaintances and endears them to their human families.
Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies. 
If you’re on our site, chances are that you have a fondness for dogs, and you probably know other dog lovers. With our large selection of dog books and gifts for dog lovers, there’s no excuse for not finding a doggie-themed present for the next birthday or special occasion. Of course, you don’t even need a particular reason to send dog lover gifts to friends and family. Put your dog pride on display with decals for your car, laptop or fridge that have interesting and funny sayings about pets. There are also magnets that you can attach to your car and easily remove, and they’re great as gifts for dog lovers. Choose from bone-shaped magnets that exclaim things like, “I Love My Mutt” or “Bad to the Bone.” If you’re going for a funnier vibe, you can get “The World Does Revolve Around My Dog” or “I Kiss My Dog on the Lips.” Anyone waiting at a light behind you is sure to get a chuckle. Bookworms (whether that’s you or a friend) will enjoy our “pet library” that has dog books of all kinds. Even if you’re not so into books, you might find a great pet book that gives you training tips, grooming guides, potty training steps or breed information. We also have pet book memoirs, celebrity dog books, lighthearted tales about life with dogs, and emotional accounts of dogs overcoming the odds. You can pick out dog décor items to fill your home with pet happiness, including dog picture frames to show off your fur baby, wall art and pup-themed doormats. Or send dog lover gifts to friends and family as a nice surprise. We’ve got tons of pet parent favorites—just have a look, and you’re sure to find something that catches your eye.
Labrador retrievers are easily recognized by their broad head, drop ears and large, expressive eyes. Two trademarks of the Lab are the thick but fairly short double coat, which is very water repellent, and the well known "otter tail." The tail is thick and sturdy and comes off the topline almost straight. The feet are described as "webbed," with longer skin between the toes to aid in swimming. Color can range from black through chocolate to a red/yellow or even almost white.
Yeti Dog Bowl: You probably already know that Yeti makes the world’s best coolers (hard and soft), and the company has quickly built an expanded product line of backpacks, drinkware and other accessories, all leveraging its reputation for products that are over-engineered and nearly indestructible. Well, they took the same approach to dog bowls, with the company’s single model, the Boomer 8, so named because it is large and holds up to eight cups of water (or food) enough for any dog (or more than one). It is built with double-walled, non-insulated, food safe 18/8 stainless steel, and is just bombproof rugged, very easy to clean, resistant to rust, and impervious to even the roughest roughhousing. It has a non-slip ring on the bottom, is heavy enough to not get knocked over, can even go in the dishwasher, and comes in four colors ($50).
Experts have a couple of different theories about how the breed came to be called the Labrador. One is that the name is borrowed from the Spanish word for laborer — labrador — which is certainly a fitting description, or that the breed is related to the dogs that accompanied Portuguese fishermen who trawled the Grand Banks off the coast of Labrador and its neighbor Newfoundland. Those dogs, known as cani di castro laboreiro, performed such tasks as retrieving items from the water, including fish-laden nets, and swimming messages from boat to boat. Sounds like a Lab, all right.
We have broken this list down into several categories for easy browsing and to help you locate something to fit the personality of the dog lover in your life. We have also added links to where each item can be purchased and the official MyDogLikes reviews for your convenience. Note that some of these are affiliate links, so MyDogLikes will earn a commission if you choose to make a purchase.
Zanjeer ("Chain", or "Shackles"), a detection dog who detected arms and ammunition used in the 1993 Mumbai (Bombay) serial explosions. During his service, he helped recover 57 country-made bombs, 175 petrol bombs, 11 military grade armaments, 242 grenades and 600 detonators. His biggest contribution to the police force and the city was the detection of 3,329 kg of RDX. He also helped detect 18 Type 56 rifles and five 9mm pistols.
Pamper your pup — and reclaim your bed — with the best dog bed you can buy. The DogBed4Less Orthopedic Memory Foam dog bed is made with four inches of high-density, hypoallergenic memory foam that's protected with a waterproof inner lining and a soft microsuede external cover. Between these two layers is a third cover made from heavy-duty, 100% cotton denim, so it's easy to clean and should last a long time.
But what to buy for the dog lover in your life? We’ve made your search a little simpler by rounding up 53 top-rated gifts every dog lover will appreciate, from dog-themed photo frames and mugs to useful items that will benefit your gift recipient and their favorite pup alike. Our picks are listed below in alphabetical order for easy reference. Ratings information is based on Amazon.com reviews and is current at the time of this writing. Happy shopping!
It has been shown that out of all dog breeds, it is the Labrador Retriever that is most likely to be obese.[73] In a 2016 published study it was shown that out of 310 Labradors, most were missing all or parts of the POMC gene. This gene plays a part in appetite regulation as well as indication of the amount of one's stored fat. The study concluded that the absence of that gene had a significant impact on Labrador weight and appetite.[70][73] The POMC gene mutation is present in only one other breed – the Flat-Coated Retriever.[70]
The progenitors of the Labrador retriever were actually from Newfoundland and Labrador exceptionally, the breed known as the Newfoundland was created near the same time in Labrador. The two breeds' names and origins were mixed once moved into England and both North and South America. The dog from Labrador became the large, long-furred dog we see and know today, and the dog from Newfoundland became the Labrador.[citation needed]
As with some other breeds, the Conformation (typically "Show", "English" or "bench") and the Field (typically "Working" or "American") lines differ, although both lines are bred in both countries. In general, however, Conformation Labradors tend to be bred as medium-sized dogs, shorter and stockier with fuller faces and a slightly calmer nature than their Field counterparts, which are often bred as taller, lighter-framed dogs, with slightly less broad faces and a slightly longer nose. However, Field Labradors should still be proportional and fit within American Kennel Club standards. With Field Labradors, excessively long noses, thin heads, long legs, and lanky frames are not considered standard. These two types are informal and not codified or standardised; no distinction is made by the AKC or other kennel clubs, but the two types come from different breeding lines. Australian stock also exists; though not seen in the West, they are common in Asia. These dogs are also very good with children.
The warm and intelligent Lab is America's number one breed registered with the American Kennel Club. Even non-dog people can recognize a Lab, and artists and photographers have captured his image countless times — usually as the loyal companion, waiting patiently by his owner's side. Built for sport, the Lab is muscular and athletic. He has a short, easy-care coat, friendly demeanor, keen intelligence, and plenty of energy. Devotion to this breed runs deep; Labs are loving, people-oriented dogs who live to serve their families, and owners and fans sometimes liken their Labs to angels. The breed originated on the island of Newfoundland, off the northeastern Atlantic coast of Canada. Originally called the St. John's dog, after the capital city of Newfoundland, he was bred to help the local fishermen — hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish that had escaped the nets — as well as to be a family dog. Today, most Labs skip the hard labor and spend their days being pampered and loved by their people. However, some Labs still serve as indispensable working dogs. The Lab's sweet nature makes him an excellent therapy dog, visiting homes for the elderly and hospitals, and his intelligence makes him an ideal assistance dog for the handicapped. He also excels as a search and rescue dog or as a retriever for hunters, thanks to his athletic build, strong nose, and courageous nature. And Labs have also become the breed to beat at dog sports such as agility and obedience competitions — especially obedience. There's one dog job that Labs are hopeless at: watchdog. In fact, owners say their sweet, helpful Lab is likely to greet an intruder and happily show him where the goods are stashed. Labrador Retrievers have proven their usefulness and versatility throughout the breed's history, easily shifting from fisherman's companion, to field retriever, to show dog, to modern working dog. One role has remained constant: wonderful companion and friend.

A weekly combing is all that is needed for a Labrador Retriever, since their water resistant coat is also designed to be soil and rubbish resistant. While brushing is a luxury rather than a necessity since its coat is designed to naturally care for itself, it does go along way to improving your Lab's natural beauty and overall health. Regular exercise, on the other hand, is of the utmost importance. The Labrador is a high-energy dog that loves to play, and it should be given the opportunity to do this on a daily basis. When possible, Labrador Retrievers should be allowed to swim, as it is one of their favorite activities. Pools, beaches, rivers, lakes; all are sporting fun for a Lab. Just as with a child, you will want to safeguard your young Lab while it is in the water, to make sure it feels safe and has a way of getting out of the water. Over time, and with confidence, it will learn, but young swimmers can panic or tire quickly.

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Chewy offers a wide selection of gifts for dogs that are perfect for any holiday or occasion. If you want your beloved fur friend to be dressed to the nines as a pet birthday gift or for a special occasion, you can find fun dog clothes that will have them catching everyone’s eye. A cute dog bandana or bowtie, like the Blueberry Pet dog and cat bow tie set, will let people know that it’s a day of celebration for you and your dog. If you are celebrating another year of time well-spent with your best furry friend, you can have them wear a dashing birthday hat like the Frisco birthday cake dog hat. A fun dog hat is sure to create the perfect photo opportunity that captures all the fun memories.


-Four kinds of treats! There is a treat tin decorated in dog doodles. The treat tin comes filled with chicken and apple tenders. Your dog will also find duck treats and bite-sized chicken treats, which are the perfect size to put in their stocking. Plus, there are heart-shaped coal treats flavored with tummy safe charcoal and a hint of apple. Your pup will love you for these tasty treats.

If you're going to share your home with a dog, you'll need to deal with some level of dog hair on your clothes and in your house. However, shedding does vary greatly among the breeds: Some dogs shed year-round, some "blow" seasonally -- produce a snowstorm of loose hair -- some do both, and some shed hardly at all. If you're a neatnik you'll need to either pick a low-shedding breed, or relax your standards.


Also check out my 2018 Gift Guide for Foodies, Kitchen and Cooks, my 2018 Gift Guide for Skiing, Fitness & Outdoor Activities, plus last year’s 2017 Forbes Gift Guides, with many great picks that are still perfect, on a wide range of gifting topics including: Beer, Wine & Spirits (here); Food (here); Kitchen & Home (here); Whiskey Lovers' Gifts (here); Cycling (here); Skiing (here); and Golf & Fitness (here).
During the 1880s, the 3rd Earl of Malmesbury, the 6th Duke of Buccleuch and the 12th Earl of Home collaborated to develop and establish the modern Labrador breed. The dogs Buccleuch Avon and Buccleuch Ned, given by Malmesbury to Buccleuch, were mated with female dogs carrying blood from those originally imported by the 5th Duke and the 10th Earl of Home. The offspring are considered to be the ancestors of modern Labradors.[14][15]
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