Named the “Labrador” in 1887 by the Earl of Malmesbury—an English hunter and breeder—the Lab actually originated in 18th-century Newfoundland, Canada. At the time two breeds emerged from the St. John’s Water Dog: the Greater Newfoundland and the Lesser Newfoundland. The Greater Newfoundland dogs worked in teams hauling fish, but the Lesser Newfoundland had a rugged friendliness that fishermen valued. Fishermen marveled that these smaller Newfoundlands kept their can-do attitude even after long days retrieving nets from the sea, playing happily with children back when returning to shore. Soon, these dogs came to Poole, England—the Newfoundland fishing-trade hub—where hunters and sportsmen honed them into skilled hunters and retrievers. In 1903 the English Kennel Club recognized the Labrador Retriever as an official breed. The American Kennel Club certified the breed in 1917.

It’s OK that your dog sleeps in bed with you every night, and it’s OK that you don’t sleep as well without the little guy snuggling at your feet. This pup-sized sleeping bag zips into just about whatever human-sized model you own and lets you bring the closeness into the wilderness. You each get your own space, with plenty of cuddle room in there too.
As with some other breeds, the Conformation (typically "Show", "English" or "bench") and the Field (typically "Working" or "American") lines differ, although both lines are bred in both countries. In general, however, Conformation Labradors tend to be bred as medium-sized dogs, shorter and stockier with fuller faces and a slightly calmer nature than their Field counterparts, which are often bred as taller, lighter-framed dogs, with slightly less broad faces and a slightly longer nose. However, Field Labradors should still be proportional and fit within American Kennel Club standards. With Field Labradors, excessively long noses, thin heads, long legs, and lanky frames are not considered standard. These two types are informal and not codified or standardised; no distinction is made by the AKC or other kennel clubs, but the two types come from different breeding lines. Australian stock also exists; though not seen in the West, they are common in Asia. These dogs are also very good with children.

Monthly, curated boxes of goods delivered directly to your door are all the rage for humans. Whether it’s kitchen ingredients, clothes, or personal care products, having experts put together a killer package of the best in any product category is a proven business model in the new economy. The problem is, dogs have been feeling left out, and nobody even realized it. Except dog people (did we mention they’re a little different?). Every Bark Box includes toys, snacks, and chewables that will have dogs and their owners rolling with joy for weeks at a time.


My dog loves this! She gets super stoked when she sees me take it out for her to play with. I combine a level 1, level 2 & this level 3 Trixie game, & it keeps her busy for a bit. I am a professional dog trainer & recommend interactive games to my clients, and Trixie makes by far the coolest & most durable (unless you have serious chewers or highly destructive dogs). This one is pretty difficult, so unless your dog is beyond food motivated, opt for a level 1 or 2 to pique your dog's interest in puzzle games first, otherwise your dog may give up. A super fun toy, especially if your dog enjoys nose work.
If you're looking for a puppy, you'll find that Labs vary depending on what breeder you choose. Some Labs are bred for competitions testing their skill as working dogs, and others are bred to get as close as possible to the ideal look, movement, and temperament of the breed. You'll also find breeders who aim for both looks and utility. Labs bred for the show ring tend to be slightly heavier and more solidly built than those intended for canine careers.
“My favorite dog-related item that I personally own is a gift I gave myself when I got into the business of dog training: a specially sized Bone Toggle Collar from Wagwear, an New York City–based doggy accessories boutique,” says Anthony Newman, a certified canine-behavior consultant who founded Calm Energy Dog Training. “I’ve worn it on my wrist now for nearly ten years, all day every day; it expresses my love for dogs and it’s truly unique, with beautiful hand-stitched leather and brass. Though I suppose you can also use it as an actual dog collar, as founder and designer Amy intended it.”
Our chihuahuas just don't 'get' it. I think the problem is that they aren't getting rewarded quickly enough to keep their attention and connect 'roll the ball' with 'get a treat'... even on the easiest setting. I've noticed that the treats dispense when the ball is rolled faster than they roll it, so maybe it just isn't the best option for toy breeds.
Give your pup’s mealtimes a personalized touch with these ceramic bowls lovingly emblazoned with their name. They’re fully customizable, giving you the flexibility to choose a font that reflects your dog’s personality—the seller will even send proofs of the final design before it goes into production. Measuring 7” in diameter and 2.75” in height, each bowl holds up to six cups of kibble or water and can be hand-washed (dishwashers may cause the vinyl name decal to deteriorate). The seller, Loges and Lily, also offers smaller bowls designed for tinier breeds.

The sturdy, well-balanced Labrador Retriever can, depending on the sex, stand from 21.5 to 24.5 inches at the shoulder and weigh between 55 to 80 pounds. The dense, hard coat comes in yellow, black, and a luscious chocolate. The head is wide, the eyes glimmer with kindliness, and the thick, tapering “otter tail” seems to be forever signaling the breed’s innate eagerness.
Mikey is a sweet, older gentleman.  He came back to us when his previous adopter became ill. As a result, Mikey developed some separation anxiety that he has been working through, along with getting a few pounds off.  Now in a less stressful environment, he is adjusting and returning to his old self but it is very possible he will require some time and patience as he adjusts to new surroundings with his adopting family.  Once adopted, Mikey really needs stability and lots of love to understand that he is home and that someone else is in charge again.
If you're looking for a puppy, you'll find that Labs vary depending on what breeder you choose. Some Labs are bred for competitions testing their skill as working dogs, and others are bred to get as close as possible to the ideal look, movement, and temperament of the breed. You'll also find breeders who aim for both looks and utility. Labs bred for the show ring tend to be slightly heavier and more solidly built than those intended for canine careers.
The Whistle GPS Tracker is a simple clip on device that notifies you (via app and text) if your pet ever escapes from the designated area you create. It also lets you track their location using cellular and GPS technology and monitor their activity and health. Plus, it's water proof... just in case they decide to go for a swim. Just clip it on to the collar they already wear.
The Labrador is a moderate dog, not extreme in any way. It is square or slightly longer than tall, of fairly large bone and substance. The breed’s broad head and strong jaws enabled the dog to carry the largest game birds, such as Canada geese. A heavy body and strong legs enable the dog to swim and run powerfully. The coat, which is short, straight, and dense with a soft undercoat, is weatherproof and helps to protect it from icy waters. The Lab is a working retriever and possesses style without over-refinement, and substance without clumsiness.
Not every Labrador visit to the vet is for a genetic problem. Broken toes and torn toenails, cuts and scrapes, and foxtails embedded in the skin are just another day at the office for these big, active dogs. And like human athletes, Labrador Retrievers are prone to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. The cause of these types of injuries is not yet clear. Researchers are looking into whether anatomy or genetics are predisposing factors.
In this guide, we've included the best dog gifts of 2018 for all sizes and personalities, from classic chew toys to unexpected treats your pooch will adore. Many of these gifts range vastly in prices to accommodate any budget as well. So, let's start celebrating the holiday season with this guide, and get ready to watch your furbaby's eyes light up with excitement!
If you’re not totally sure exactly what type of toy or treat to give, Shirley Braha, who’s mom to Instagram-famous Marnie the Dog, recommends giving the gift of replenishing treats. “The first thing that comes to mind is a BarkBox subscription, because I feel like dogs are always running out of treats, and high-quality treats are weirdly expensive.”
Sites like Petfinder.com and Adopt-a-Pet.com can have you searching for a Labrador in your area in no time flat. The site allows you to be very specific in your requests (housetraining status, for example) or very general (all the Labradors available on Petfinder across the country). AnimalShelter.org can help you find animal rescue groups in your area. Also some local newspapers have “pets looking for homes” sections you can review.
Andrea Romano is a freelance writer and video editor in New York. She has worked for several publications, including Mashable, Travel + Leisure, and Bustle, as well as Brit + Co. She received her BA in Theater from the University of Northern Colorado and a Master’s degree in Media Studies and Film from The New School. When she is not working, she is writing sketch comedy and storytelling through The People's Improv Theatre and loves to knit and play music.
I keep a watching eye out for everything and am a really good alarm system, making sure everyone knows I am home! I love people visiting and snuggling up with everyone. Food, treats? Keep it coming!!! Yum Yum! Bath/Shower? NOOOO, thank you!! Swimming? Who knows, but it's really cold and I haven't tried that wet activity yet. I always thought water was just for drinking?
The Labrador Retriever was recognized as a breed by the AKC in 1917, but pedigrees for this breed can be traced to 1878. The breed is split into two main types: field-bred, or American Labrador, and show-bred, or English Labrador. While both types come from the original Labradors bred in England, there are differences between them. Show-bred Labradors tend to be stocky, with a calm demeanor, while field-bred Labs are leaner and more energetic.
Let your favorite dog mom show her puppy love with this stylish bracelet. The charms represent an eternal love for dogs and the paw prints they leave on your heart. All the strands are different, to show that not all dogs all the same, but they are all beautiful in their own way. This fashionable faux leather bracelet has an adjustable lobster clasp and chain closure.

The sturdy, well-balanced Labrador Retriever can, depending on the sex, stand from 21.5 to 24.5 inches at the shoulder and weigh between 55 to 80 pounds. The dense, hard coat comes in yellow, black, and a luscious chocolate. The head is wide, the eyes glimmer with kindliness, and the thick, tapering “otter tail” seems to be forever signaling the breed’s innate eagerness.
Lab mixes are one of the most popular mixed breeds available from shelters and rescues. Labrador Retriever mixes can share common traits with any number of other breeds, but resemble Labs in physical characteristics and personality traits. However, many shelters do not have genetic evidence of a Lab mix’s background, so breed heritage and personality traits cannot be stated with certainty.
Help your dog mom start the morning right with a fresh cup of coffee served in an inspiring and adorable personalized pet mug. Every morning will feel a lot more cheery when a dog mom looks at her pet's face whenever she takes a sip of coffee. Consider a personalized pet portrait mug from DesiraesKitchen . The sellers of this mug transform a furbaby's photograph into an illustration and print it on a mug. What makes this mug even sweeter is the delicate floral designs surrounding the portrait.

In the early years of the breed through to the mid-20th century, Labradors of a shade we would now call "yellow" were in fact a dark, almost butterscotch, colour (visible in early yellow Labrador photographs). The shade was known as "Golden" until required to be changed by the UK Kennel Club, on the grounds that "Gold" was not actually a colour. Over the 20th century a preference for far lighter shades of yellow through to cream prevailed; until today most yellow Labradors are of this shade. Also fawn has been a common colour in the yellow lab variety.[25]
It’s worth noting that these tests can provide really valuable info on your dog’s behaviors – for example, it may explain why your pooch barks so much – perhaps he has some hound in him! This kind of info can then let you create a more customized training plan tailored to your dog’s inherent instincts. And who knows – if you find out that you have a dog with some hound in him, you could make it big taking up truffle hunting!
My name is Tin Top and I am a truly amazing dog! My life kind of is like one of those country songs that starts out sad and then ends up happy. My sad start was being found on a rural rode with a gunshot wound in my shoulder. It shattered my front leg, so the amazing vet and his team had to remove it. But then they worked with me and helped me learn to walk on three legs. Cool huh? Soon a foster for DFW Lab Rescue came and took me to his home. I get lots of food (I was very, very, skinny), a nice warm cozy bed and tons of love from my foster parents. There are two foster lab brothers that I like but I am not really into playing with them.
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